Being Black in America

Being Black in America

In America, we are taught that to be Black in America it is a crime. The segregation of Blacks in America today is more sinister than the times of the Civil Rights movement. Society uses bias and systematic oppression to continuously oppress Blacks. The society also uses the law to implement superiority

The Culture I Have Never Experienced

The Culture I Have Never Experienced

Most of modern society still struggles with the conflict between white and black culture, and during my childhood, I found myself reflecting more and more on my personal and cultural identity. Living in a household with white siblings meant that my idea of “blackness” was nonexistent. I was always an extremely happy child, but was too young to understand the concept of race. Nevertheless, I always found it strange when I caught other kids at school staring at my skin. I was used to their color, but they were not used to mine.

Black People Drink, Black People Smoke

Black People Drink, Black People Smoke

I went online and found research to show that black people drink more than they smoke. I also found that white people actually use more drugs than most people do. In fact, white people even drink more than black people do. They are the top race in the U.S. that drinks alcohol and are in second place when it comes to using drugs. This came as a shock to me because black people are often seen as the race that uses the most drugs and alcohol. The question I want answered is why black people are portrayed as alcoholics and drug addicts by society.

"How Do You See Me?” The Portrayal of Black Women in Media

"How Do You See Me?” The Portrayal of Black Women in Media

So how do you see me? How do I see myself? I don't want to be compared to the barbaric acts on television and I don't want you to compare me to that as well. How can we break this ideology that all black women are the same? Just because a woman is selling herself for her own personal and financial gains, that automatically makes me accountable? I don't think so.

Black Excellence: Kiera Estes

Black Excellence: Kiera Estes

“I am just one person, part of a minority, who is excelling, becoming dominant and successful in my field.”

With all odds against her, junior chemistry major, Kiera Estes, has risen above her peers and excelled academically through doing research, working in the lab, and receiving awards and scholarships for her work. She may only be 22 credits shy of graduating but she is far from concluding her scholarly domination.